Liberia: Additional Financing to Improve Health Services in Liberia

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WASHINGTON – The World Bank has approved an Additional Financing (AF) of $31 million to strengthen health systems and improve health service delivery to women, children and adolescents in Liberia. This Financing, comprising of US$20 million International Development Association (IDA) concessional credit and a grant of US$11 million from the Global Financing Facility (GFF), will support the delivery of essential health services which have been challenged by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Despite improvements in the health system, Liberia still has some challenges leading to poor health and nutrition outcomes. Through this project, the Government of Liberia will be able to fill an existing financing gap, cover costs associated with expanding coverage of existing activities under the parent Project and implement new activities,” said World Bank Liberia Country Manager Khwima Nthara. “Ultimately, the project is expected to facilitate systems strengthening, improve service delivery, and achieve better health and nutrition outcomes in the country.”

This AF is expected to improve operational efficiency and equity of access to quality healthcare services by scaling-up the provision of high-impact interventions, supporting the procurement of essential medicines and childhood vaccines. The financing will ensure rehabilitation and extension of health infrastructure at existing primary health facilities and integrating activities on health systems strengthening into a systematic approach towards achieving Universal Health Coverage (UHC). While the project will be implemented countrywide, the existing Performance-Based Financing (PBF) scheme will be scaled-up from three to six counties: Gbarpolu, Rivercess, Sinoe, Bomi, Grand Kru, and Maryland.

“The existing maternal, child health, and nutrition challenges in Liberia have worsened since the COVID-19 outbreak in the country. This AF will help to maintain delivery of essential health and nutrition services at community and primary care levels, contribute to health systems redesign, and enhance service quality and resilience,” said Co-Task Team Leaders Collins Chansa and Kazumi Inden.

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