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Liberia: ‘Indicators of Civil Wars Exist in Weah’s Gov’t’ – Former Lawmaker

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People run amok in Monrovia during a recent protest following the closure if three radio stations by government

Monrovia – Former Grand Bassa County Representative Jeh Byron Brown says vices that immensely contributed to the outbreak of the civil war in Liberia remain visible under the Coalition for Democratic Change (CDC) led government of President George Manneh Weah.

Browne, who is also a stalwart of the opposition Liberty Party, said the Liberian civil war did not break up due to the lack of infrastructural development.

He said marginalization of a larger group of the country’s population by a selective few government officials at the time, triggered years of civil unrest.

“We had better roads and all of the facilities that needed at that time in Liberia, but war came because of marginalization. When the elites at the time felt that they were the only people, the aborigines took issues against them,” said Brown, who served two terms at the House of Representatives.

Mr. Brown added that the marginalization of qualified Liberians seeking job opportunities in the public sector based on party is troubling. 

He said: “And those who considered themselves aborigines are now putting people aside saying ‘these people are Congo people and they should not work because they are elites’. I think these are bad signs of leadership and this government has given rebirth to that. I think the evil baby Charles Brumskine talked about is born-and that birth is marginalization.”

The former Grand Bassa County lawmaker said most officials are not appointed to positions of trust-based upon competence, but due to their affiliation with the ruling party.

“We had better roads and all of the facilities that needed at that time in Liberia, but war came because of marginalization. When the elites at the time felt that they were the only people, the aborigines took issues against them.”

Jeh Byron Brown , Member of the House of Representatives

He observed that although other qualified Liberians previously occupied some of these public offices, they were demoted, replaced or removed because of their affiliation with other political parties.

“While it is true that we are moving forward with this peace, I want to believe that the government is making lot of mistakes. Marginalization is one of the biggest issues in this country,” he said. 

“When people, who are in authority especially the ruling party feel that once you are not in the party, you cannot provide services to the Liberian people by work; especially when the President said this family cannot win elections in this country as long as I am the President of the Republic of Liberia-that’s another form of marginalization.”

According to the former lawmaker, the 54th National Legislature is divided due to “marginalization”.

“There is total marginalization in this country even at the Legislature. The Legislature is divided. This is the first time to see Independent Legislators-instead of having a majority or minority groups,” he further noted.  

Meanwhile, Mr. Brown has slammed President George Weah’s decision to open a church, terming it as a move that has “indirectly marginalized” churches in country.

On December 31, 2018, the Liberian leader dedicated his Forky Klon Jlaleh Family Fellowship Church on the Robertsfield Highway.

The service and dedication ceremony was attended by Senate Pro-Tempore Albert Chie, Speaker of the House Bhofal Chambers and several cabinet ministers.

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