Senator George Weah Describes Critics As Troublemakers

Senator George Weah Describes Critics As Troublemakers

Monrovia - The standard bearer of the Coalition for Democratic Change (CDC) Senator George Weah has refuted claims that his party is a party made of lawless people.

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He says the people who referred to them as lawless in the past are now causing trouble for the state.

“All of the people that thought that Cdcians (CDC partisans) are hooligans they are now the troublemakers in the country,” Sen. Weah told his partisans at the party headquarters in Congo Town Tuesday evening.

Weah: “We have been peaceful for 12 years and I want you (Cdcians) to keep that. Those who want bring problem in the country have no history of winning an election.”

There is a serious legal battle between Liberty Party and the National Election Commission (NEC) in which the Supreme Court has now ordered the NEC to give Liberty Party due process by investigating complaints brought to its attention before proceeding with the runoff election.

The runoff election is to be held between the CDC and the governing Unity Party.

Though there is hold on the runoff election, Weah encouraged his partisans not to be deterred by the Supreme Court’s ruling.

He further told his supporters not to pay attention to people who are saying that when they win the election, the international community will turn their backs on Liberia.

He added that since the pronouncement of the first round result which gave him a comfortable lead; every time he travels out of the country people are saying to him “Congratulations Mr. President”.

“I have the connection, people around the world love me and when I become President, they are going to love this country,” he said.

According to Sen. Weah, people working in government are not going to lose their jobs when CDC gets to power.

He also added that CDC government seeks to unite all Liberians.

November 7 is not a good day in the history of the CDC.

In the 2011 election, CDC partisans and officers of the Liberia National Police went into a serious riot after the party tried to assembly to quietly protest the election result.

The riot left one partisan dead.

In remembrance of the day, Senator Weah called on partisans to pray for the life that was lost on that day.