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Monrovia Traffic Court Judge Requests Living Body of Late Quincy B

Monrovia Traffic Court Judge Requests Living Body of Late Quincy B

Monrovia – The Judge of the Traffic Court, Cllr. Jomah S. Jallah, has ironically issued an arrest warrant for the living body of the late musical sensation, Quincy B, 20 days after his burial.


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The arrest warrant was sought by the Government of Liberia through the Ministry of Justice.

The 23-year-old music star who met his untimely death during the early hours of March 3, 2017 has been charged with recklessness, exceeding speed limit, reckless driving resulting into death, injury and property damage.

“You are hereby ordered to arrest the living body of the above mentioned defendant(s) for the above entitled cause of action and bring forth before the Monrovia Traffic Court to answer to charge levied against him by the Republic of Liberia,” the writ ordered.

The writ further asserted that Quincy B or his representative may have to pay for the damage resulting from the accident.

While it remains a fact that the corpse cannot appear before the court, some lawyers have described the writ as a serious inadvertent error on the part of the traffic court judge.

Quincy B provided a therapeutic feeling bigger than entertainment. His sonorous voice and deep lyrics healed people and rehabilitated others.

Quincy B was widely loved by both the young and old folks. His music was like an eraser to the hurting scars of the first and second civil wars in Liberia between 1989 – 1997 and 1999 – 2003 respectively.

With evergreen hit songs like ‘Put Liberia First’, ‘We Don’t Talk Anymore’, ‘My Dream’ featuring Scientific, ‘Tumba Tumba’ and his latest single titled ‘I Pledge’, Quincy B make his breakthrough in the music industry since his emergence in 2013 and so much consistency has kept his enviable career afloat.

Reports revealed that Quincy was from a very humble home and he had just built a house for his parents before his shocking demise.

Quincy’s parents fled Liberia to Ghana during the civil war.

The young lad schooled in Ghana up to the university level where he reportedly studied Music Education in preparation for his destiny and later returned with his family to Liberia in 2012 during which he ignited his musical career of rapid success.

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